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Email "double-header"...

One of the best ways to get better at copywriting and come up with new angles more easily is to constantly study other promos. Every copywriter worth his or her salt keeps a collection of high-performing controls that they read, file away, and refer to again and again to stimulate new ideas and thinking. One of the easiest ways to develop a solid "swipe file" is to get on email lists and keep tabs on what stands out to you...and especially, what you keep seeing again and again. Best of all, it doesn't cost you anything to do so (unless you end up so convinced, you buy something!) Unless you see an email repeated, you don't know if it's a "control" or if it was successful. But you can still get ideas and learn from it. Today I want to look at a few health emails that landed in my inbox and talk about what we can learn or take away from them. Let's start with one I keep seeing again and again and again... I'm pretty sure it's been doing gangbusters ever since COVID-19 hit. It's an affiliate email I'm getting since I'm on the Institute for Natural Healing email list. Let's take a look...



Let's start with that subject line: Breathe like THIS to live longer. Now, one thing that's on more people's minds than ever these days is breathing and maintaining lung health. So simply using that word "breathe" in your email is going to grab some eyeballs, without having to make a risky claim. It's then combined with a big promise: "live longer". And there's curiosity as well, as well as an implied ease of use: "like THIS". The email (after the introduction from "Amanda") starts with an opening line that opens a loop that forces the reader to either click or read further: "It's a shocking but little known fact--" It then throws out a surprising statistic followed by a challenge: "Do you know how strong your lungs are?" It then quickly sets up the problem (doctors don't check your lung strength) and teases about the solution (strong lungs=long life, here's a way to "naturally improve it"). The P.S. is actually pretty long as email P.S.'s go, but if the reader hasn't clicked by then, by going much deeper into romancing the solution and agitating about the problem, it gives the reader that extra irresistible "push" to click through to the VSL (which it shows a small screenshot of). This email and subject line are very well done, and I can see why I keep seeing it! If you click on the email image above, it'll take you the VSL (which, after a few moments, you can click out of and "stay on page" and read the full transcript, which I always prefer to do!)

Next up is an email I saw for the first time yesterday. Like the other email I just shared with you, I didn't write it. It expertly taps into "envy" and "anger" about how the wealthy get access to things that the "little guy" doesn't...an approach I've seen used (and used myself) for financial promo emails (those Wall street "fat cats" and hedge fund billionaires always having the edge). In this case though, it's a promo for an anti-aging supplement. It manages to take a very fresh approach with a somewhat "done-to-death" stem cell anti-aging story, and it's very effective. Let's take a look at the email...


First off, that subject line definitely stands out in my email inbox. That's because it's making a declaration that's both believable but also stimulates curiosity (while stirring a combined emotional response of envy and anger). It doesn't sound like the typical "big promise" email subject line and almost comes across as more editorial versus promotional. The opening paragraphs in the email flow smoothly from the subject line with nary a disconnect, setting up the "scene" and stimulating curiosity to find out their "secret". The video screenshot image with the blacked out eye areas at what looks to be a gathering of celebrities is a nice touch as well...adding to the mystery that must be solved by clicking. By playing up the idea that celebrities are paying $100,000 for this solution, it's also overcoming any possible price objection early on by putting that comparison into the prospect's mind. Then the copy specifically calls out who this is for by saying, "If you were born before 1970 and concerned about your health" (they left out the word "are")... It then brilliantly positions the solution as their secret "aging vaccine". Whenever you can use words that tap into what's all over the news and on prospects' minds, USE them! Just like in the previous example with "breathe", "vaccines" are all we're hearing about or thinking about these days. So taking that and presenting an anti-aging supplement as an "aging vaccine" is a great idea. In this case, it's important to use the parentheses around it to show that it isn't really a vaccine, but acts like one. And not only does the copy promise you'll discover how to inoculate yourself against aging and decline, you'll get to "level the playing field". Take that, you ultra-wealthy A-list celebrities! Right before the sign-off, yet another call to action carries forth the idea that this is something controversial or shocking, making it all the more impossible not to click: "Click here for all the explosive details." This is great copy. The P.S. throws on some social proof to the big claims made earlier with the select testimonial quotes. If you click on the email image above, it'll take you to the following sales page...

I don't have time to get into this sales page, and I encourage you to click on the image above and read it yourself. I've seen this sales page multiple times probably for at least a year or longer, so I'm quite certain it's a strong control. One thing I like, aside from the really great design which enhances the believability of the copy, is how there's no disconnect between the setup in the email to what you see when you land here. That can be tricky at times when you're coming up with fresh email creative to drive traffic to a long-running control sales page. As long as there's at least a prominent common thread, you have more avenues open to you. Here, we have the "$100,000 stem cell therapies" mentioned, which connects to those wealthy Americans getting the unfair advantage "big idea" in the email and subject line. Overall, very well done. (If anyone knows who wrote either of these emails and/or promos, let me know!) Keep your eyes out for what's in your email inbox...you never know where you're going to get your next killer idea from! Yours for smarter marketing, Kim P.S. If you're interested in learning more about mentoring with me, you'll want to click here to find out more. My "Fast Track to A-List" copy mentoring program is the only mentoring option I offer, and this year's class has been making huge strides since we started working together in January. I'm now beginning to fill spots for my 2021 class, and it's already 25% sold out. So if you've been kicking around the idea of mentoring with me, you'll want to click here.


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